CCJHR-ISS21 seminar on climate migration

The CCJHR and the Institute for Social Science in the 21st Century (ISS21) Migration Cluster jointly hosted an inter-disciplinary seminar on climate migration on Thursday 2nd March 2017 in the School of Law, UCC.

Few people challenge the strong scientific evidence that anthropogenic climate change is a reality, and is negatively impacting many parts of the world. Indeed, one of the most oft-quoted consequences of global climate change is the possibility of large-scale human migration in response to rising sea levels, increased desertification, and intensification of natural disasters such as hurricanes and flooding.

Therefore, this seminar considered the human, social and legal implications of climate migration from an inter-disciplinary perspective, bringing together researchers from the fields of geography, philosophy and the law. Professor Robert McLeman from Wilfrid Laurier University Ontario and Trinity College Dublin, commenced by examining why people migrate and the different categories of climate-relating migration. Professor McLeman set out a variety of scenarios, including amenity migration (for example people in China migrating away from urban areas to avoid extensive smog and pollution), seasonal migration arising from seasonal floods in Bangladesh or dry season migration in India and central Asia, and climate extremes such as Hurricane Mitch which prompted a pulse of short-term evacuations and distress migration. Professor McLeman concluded by stressing that we should not fear floods of climate refugees but focus on addressing root causes, building adaptive capacity and creating basic legal protections and rights.

Next, Dr Cara Nine from the Department of Philosophy, UCC presented on her research into two key aspects of climate migration. First, Dr Nine examined the issues of territory and sovereignty in the context of disappearing states such as the small Pacific Islands that comprise Kiribati and Tuvalu. Applying John Locke’s proviso mechanism to territorial rights, Dr Nine queried when a state or people might become a candidate to gain sovereignty over new territory due to the disappearance of their original state. Dr Nine then examined the concept of place attachment, defined as the positively experienced bonds between persons and their environment, and identified specific interests including autonomy, self-esteem and personal identity that affect an individual’s personal interests.

Dr Dug Cubie from the School of Law, UCC addressed the legal categorisation of “climate refugees” and identified the lack of an accepted legal definition. In particular, Dr Cubie noted the multi-causal nature of migratory decisions and that, except in cases of catastrophic environmental degradation, attributing causation to climate change was challenging. Dr Cubie also highlighted the importance of considering potentially vulnerable people who remain in their homes due to ill-health, age or other reasons. The right to remain requires the application of human rights principles such as participation, empowerment and accountability to ensure adaptation with dignity. In particular, Dr Cubie noted the rights of access to information, participation in decision-making and effective access to justice arising from Principle 10 of the 1992 Rio Declaration on Environment and Development.

The seminar concluded with an open discussion with those in attendance on a variety of aspects, and the benefits of such inter-disciplinary events to share knowledge and experience across the university. For more information, see:

Climate Justice and Adaptation Strategies: public lecture, Thursday 26th June 2014, UCC

“Climate Justice and Adaptation Strategies: Linking Global and Local Initiatives”

On Thursday 26th June 2014, the CCJHR will host a free public discussion on the topic of climate justice and adaptation strategies in Room 107, Western Gateway Building, UCC.

Chaired by Professor Siobhan Mullally, this event brings together a panel of international experts on climate change, human rights and migration to analyse the impact of climate change on the most vulernable in society.

Dr Cosmin Corendea from the UN University in Bonn will commence by presenting his recent research into migration decisions by individuals and communities resulting from the increasing variability of rainfall in countries such as Bangladesh, Peru, and Tanzania. Full details of this research can be found at: www.wheretherainfalls.org

Next, Diego Quiroz-Onate will describe the experience of the Scottish Human Rights Commission in promoting a climate justice approach with policy-makers in Scotland.

Bringing the discussion to the national and local level, Oisin Coghlan from Friends of the Earth (Ireland) will analyse the pending Climate Action and Low Carbon Bill 2014, and discuss the approach to climate change taken by the Irish authorities.

Finally, Dr Dug Cubie, Faculty of Law, UCC will describe the national adaptation framework for Ireland before leading a Q&A session with all contributors.

Date: Thursday 26th June 2014
Time: 4.00pm – 6.00pm
Venue: Room 107, Western Gateway Building, University College Cork

ALL WELCOME
There is no registration fee for this event.
Advance booking is required via www.eventbrite.ie (search for CCJHR).

Human Dignity as a Focus for Criminal Justice and Human Rights: Report on 6th Annual Postgraduate Conference, April 2012

The Centre for Criminal Justice and Human Rights’ 6th Annual Postgraduate Conference was held on 26th April 2012 in Áras na Laoi, UCC on the theme of “Transformation and Reform: Structures and Mechanisms for Rights-Based Protections”. The aim was to critically examine the implications for individuals and rights-based protections that arise from recent proposals for major reforms at the national, European and international level. This was reflected in the variety and high quality of papers presented on a wide range of topics including Scottish and Irish Criminal Processes, Gender and Sexual Offences, Racism and Hate Speech, Irish Legal Processes, International Criminal Law, and International Humanitarian Law.

Professor Christopher McCrudden of Queen’s University Belfast delivered the keynote address examining An Integrated Approach to International Human Rights through the Concept of Human Dignity. Professor McCrudden traced the origins of the concept of human dignity, and noted the implications for both methodological approaches to researching and substantive enforcement of human rights that arise from a renewed focus on human dignity within international human rights law.

 

A video of the event can be seen here

The conference attracted a total of 66 attendees with speakers from across the island of Ireland and the UK, including from UCC, TCD, UCD, the Irish Council for Civil Liberties, University of Ulster, King’s College London, University of Strathclyde, NUIG, the Law Reform Commission, Griffith College Dublin, University of Nottingham, University of Aberdeen, University of Bedfordshire, Queen’s University Belfast, Queen Mary, University of London as well as legal and non-governmental practitioners.

A number of innovations were made to the conference programme this year including the introduction of a competition for best paper. The competition was won by Sarah Singer of Queen Mary, University of London. Sarah presented her paper titled “Exclusion from Refugee Status: Asylum Seekers & Terrorism in the UK” at a plenary session of the conference. The paper was very well received and provided a valuable opportunity to highlight the excellent standard of postgraduate research which the CCJHR seeks to promote.

The conference concluded with a panel discussion on the topic of Transformation and Reform. This was also a new addition to the CCJHR conference programme and allowed for reflection and discussion on the disparate issues raised in the plenary sessions and parallel workshops during the day.

We would like to take this opportunity to thank everyone who attended and presented at the conference, in particular Professor McCrudden and Sarah Singer, and for the excellent support from UCC Faculty staff on the day. Pictures from the conference and a podcast of the keynote speech by Professor McCrudden will be available shortly on the CCJHR website.

LAUNCH OF CITIZENSHIP REPORT: Living in Limbo

The Centre for Criminal Justice and Human Rights, in association with NASC and the Immigrant Council of Ireland, are pleased to announce the following event:

Launch of Citizenship Report: Living in Limbo

at a Lunchtime Seminar

The event will take place on Tuesday 13th March from 12.30 – 2 pm in the  Lewis Glucksman Gallery, UCC

Chair: Justice Catherine McGuinness

Speakers:

  • Catherine Cosgrave (Senior Solicitor, Immigrant Council of Ireland)
  • Michael Lynn B.L.
  • Fiona Finn, CEO, NASC, the Irish Immigrant Support Centre
  • Prof Siobhán Mullally (UCC, Faculty of Law)

See: http://www.nascireland.org/#/naturalisation/4556551099

 Please RSVP to info@nascireland.org

Tel. 021 4317 411

ALL Welcome

CPD Points: 1.5 available

There is no registration fee for this event. Light refreshments will be available.

For further information can be obtained by contacting Claire McCarthy, Policy and Communications officer: clairemccarthy@nascireland.org

Call for Papers: 6th Annual CCJHR Postgraduate Conference, 26th April 2012

The Centre for Criminal Justice and Human Rights (CCHJR) at University College Cork is pleased to announce that the 6th Annual Postgraduate Conference will take place on Thursday, 26th April 2012. The conference is aimed at postgraduate researchers working in the areas of criminal law, criminal justice and human rights.

The theme for this year’s event is “Transformation and Reform: Structures and Mechanisms for Rights-Based Protections”. The aim is to examine the implications for individuals and rights-based protections that arise from recent proposals for major reforms at the national, European and international level, including proposals for changes to the Irish legal profession and potential constitutional amendments, reforms of the treaties and structures of the European Union, and the UN Treaty Body Reform process. This theme is intended to encourage debate and reflection on the challenging question of ensuring the protection of fundamental rights during periods of change and crisis.

This international one-day event is aimed at promising research scholars from Ireland, the UK and Europe in the areas of law, politics, philosophy and the related social sciences. We are especially interested in papers that relate to human rights, criminal justice, criminal law or the intersection of these fields from a national, European or international perspective. We will also welcome papers dealing with issues that fall within the broad theme of the conference.

The keynote address will be delivered by Professor Christopher McCrudden of Queen’s University Belfast. Professor McCrudden is currently working on an integrated theory of comparative human rights law, and is an expert on equality and discrimination, as well as the relationship between international economic law and human rights.

Papers will be streamed thematically. The two best papers, as selected by the conference organisers, will present their paper to the plenary session of the conference.

Abstracts for papers (max. 300 words) should be submitted to the conference organisers by 20th February 2012. Successful conference submissions will be notified by 20th March 2012. To be considered for the best paper and the opportunity to present to the plenary session, full papers should then be submitted by 16th April 2012. Submissions and further enquires should be directed to ucclawconf@gmail.com.

For further information and registration details please visit: www.ucc.ie/en/ccjhr

Please note: a CPD Certificate of Attendance will be available for this conference.

Upcoming Children’s Rights Lecture – Professor Kirsten Sandberg

Professor Kirsten Sandberg of the University of Oslo and member of the UN Committee on the Rights of the Child is giving a lecture at the Faculty of Law on Thursday January 5th at 5.30 pm. The lecture – on Child Protection and Children’s Rights – will be chaired by Emily Logan, Ombudsman for Children.

The event is organised by the Child Law Clinic at UCC and supported by the College of Business and Law Research Support Initiative.

Save the Date: CCJHR 6th Annual Postgraduate Conference, 26th April 2012

The Centre for Criminal Justice and Human Rights (CCHJR) is pleased to announce that the 6th Annual Postgraduate Conference will take place in UCC on Thursday, 26th April 2012. The conference is aimed at postgraduate researchers working in the areas of criminal law, criminal justice and human rights.

Reflecting proposals for major reforms that will directly affect key national, European and international concerns, such as proposals for changes to the Irish legal profession and constitutional amendments, and the UN Treaty Body Reform process, the theme for this year’s event is “Transformation and Reform: Structures and Mechanisms for Rights-Based Protections”. This international one-day event is aimed at promising research scholars from Ireland, the UK and Europe in the areas of law, politics, philosophy and the related social sciences. Further details on the conference and a Call for Papers will be issued in early January 2012. For more information on the CCJHR, please visit: www.ucc.ie/en/ccjhr

Research Seminar – Professor Ngaire Naffine

The Duck/Rabbit and the Common Measure: The Canonical Debate about Abortion and Euthanasia Reconsidered

Professor Ngaire Naffine, University of Adelaide

Wednesday August 31st, 1-2pm

Faculty of Law – Aras na Laoi 1.64 (1st floor)

Ngaire Naffine is a Professor of Law at the University of Adelaide. She has published in the areas of criminology, criminal law, jurisprudence, feminist legal theory and medical law.  Her most recent work explores the influence of philosophy, religion and evolutionary biology on law and the legal person. She is a member of an interdisciplinary research team studying the law and ethics of consent to embryo and organ donation. She has been a Visiting International Scholar at the Hastings Bioethics Center in Garrison New York; a Visiting Scholar in the Faculty of Law, Birkbeck College, University of London, and the European University Institute in Florence Italy; and Baker-Hostetler Professor of Law at Cleveland- Marshall College of Law, Cleveland.  Professor Naffine is a Member of the College of Experts, Humanities and Creative Arts Panel, ARC and a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences of Australia.  Publications include: Law’s Meaning of Life: Philosophy, Religion, Darwin and the Legal Person, Hart Publishing, Oxford, Jan 2009; Gender and Justice (editor), Ashgate , Aldershot, England 2002 pp 482; Are Persons Property? Legal Debates about Property and Personality (with M Davies) Ashgate , Aldershot, England, 2001 pp 209; Intention in Law and Philosophy (co-editor with Rosemary Owens and John Williams), Ashgate, Aldershot, England, 2001 pp 377; Feminism and Criminology, Polity Press, Cambridge, 1997; Sexing the Subject of Law (co editor with Rosemary J Owens) 1997.

New Issue of the IJLS online

The Irish Journal of Legal Studies (IJLS) run by staff in UCC Law Faculty has a new issue on-line.

Volume 2, Issue 1 is a special edition on the Presumption of Innocence, which arises out of a seminar on that topic held at Dublin Institute of Technology at the end of 2010. The Forward to the issue was written by Mr Justice Hardiman who comments that “All in all, these papers represent a refreshing, sometimes challenging, attempt to analyse the position of the presumption of innocence in our law and the effect which it is permitted to have in practice.”

The issue contains four articles on the topic of the presumption of innocence:

If you want further information regarding making a submission or just want updates on the IJLS’s content then contact the journal at enquiries@ijls.ie

The IJLS is sponsored by NAIRTL (the National Academy for Integration of Research Teaching and Learning).

Professor Jonathan Simon: Mass Incarceration on Trial

The Centre for Criminal Justice and Human Rights at University College Cork is pleased to announce that Professor Jonathan Simon will give a seminar entitled “Mass Incarceration on Trial” on Wednesday 13th July 2011. 

Professor Simon is the Adrian A. Kragen Professor of Law at the University of California Berkley School of Law. He is the author of “Governing through Crime: How the War on Crime Transformed American Democracy and Created a Culture of Fear” (2007) and “Poor Discipline: Parole and the Social Control of the Underclass,” 1890-1990 (1993).He is also maintains and contributes to the Governing through crime and Berkley Jurisprude blogs. 

The seminar will take place at 3pm on Wednesday 13th July, 2011 in the Moot Court Room, Faculty of Law, Áras na Laoi, UCC. 

If you are interested in attending please email ccjhr@ucc.ie or phone 021 490 2728 by Monday 11th July 2011.