CCJHR Annual Distinguished Lecture 2018: Professor Rhona Smith

The Centre for Criminal Justice and Human Rights is delighted to be hosting Professor Rhona Smith to conduct our Annual Distinguished Lecture which is being held this week – Thursday 6th December 2018 from 5.30pm-8pm.

Professor Smith, the UN Special Rapporteur on the situation of human rights in Cambodia, will deliver this years Distinguished Lecture on:

The centrality of human rights in creating durable peace, stability and development: lessons from Cambodia. 

The event coincides with key human rights anniversaries including Human Rights Day (10th December) which this year marks the 70th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, and the 20th anniversary of the UN Declaration on Human Rights Defenders (9th December).

Professor Smith is highly respected expert in international human rights and has been the UN Special Rapporteur for Cambodia since 2015.

The event is being held in UCC’s Executive Education Centre, The Banking Hall, 1 Lapp’s Quay. Registration (with tea/coffee) is at 17.30. The lecture will start at 18.00 and will be followed by a short wine reception at 19.30.

Details and tickets are available on Eventbrite: https://www.eventbrite.ie/e/ccjhr-11th-distinguished-lecture-tickets-52816001081

CPD points are available.

Public Panel Discussion: “Climate Justice and Adaptation Strategies: Linking Global and Local Initiatives”

By Mark Kernan, 7th July 2014

 

As a precursor to the third in a series of workshops on Climate Justice, Human Rights, Migration and Adaptation Strategies, hosted by the Centre for Criminal Justice and Human Rights in conjunction with the EU COST Action Programme IS1101, a public discussion took place on 9th June 2014 at UCC highlighting key areas in the climate justice debate, with speakers from diverse viewpoints: academia, policy-level, and from an activist standpoint.

 

Chair for the discussion, Professor Siobhán Mullally, introduced the evening’s key talking points: how different types of migration, short-term and seasonal for example, can be an adaptation strategy in response to climate change, and the need for examination of the institutional responses to adaptive migration strategies at the global, regional, and national levels.

 

First to speak was Dr Cosmin Corendea, from the United Nations University (UNU) in Bonn and current chair of the University’s social vulnerability project, who discussed a recent UN collaborative project – Where the Rain Falls – which ran from 2011 to 2013. The project was an empirical study with a participatory ‘bottoms-up approach’ which focused on climate change, food security and human mobility in eight countries in the Global South, where seasonal rainfall, now often erratic due to climate change, acts as a trigger for non-traditional migration. The global findings of the project, based on country specific case studies, highlighted in particular that in 30% of cases forced migration was the main violation of human rights, particularly problematic in the case of rural to urban migration. The study’s key finding however found that the most important issue facing climate-induced migrants in all countries was food security. As a specific example, in Tanzania climate change is now impacting on both the wet and dry seasons, where the monsoon season often falls later than expected thus causing confusion to traditional migratory patterns. As a result, communities who migrate to other regions at non-traditional times, due to crop failure for instance, now face severe human rights problems, often in conflict over resources with host communities. Dr Corendea however was keen to point out that ‘migratory reaction adaptations’ differ considerably in diverse regions of the world. Responses in Vietnam to erratic rainfalls for instance are different for a host of reasons from Peru, for geographic or cultural reasons, and local and national action plans to deal with such a diversity of migratory responses must take this into account.

 

Second to speak on adaptation strategies, this time from a Global North policy level perspective was Diego Quiroz-Onate, Policy Officer with the Scottish Human Rights Commission. In his talk on climate justice in Scotland, three themes where outlined. First, he argued that human rights are not adequately discussed in climate change reports. Instead, climate change is communicated overwhelmingly in terms of fiscal policy, economics and depleting resources and as a result the social element is ignored or at best downplayed. Climate change displacement impacts on housing rights, for example when flooding acts as a push factor resulting in homelessness, and sometimes destitution, a direct consequence. Therefore the integration of a strong human rights framework at the policy and legislative level is vital for both adaptation and mitigation. Second, and following on from the first theme, the human rights-based approach gives added value in the design, implementation and evaluation of law, policies and practices. Human rights impact assessments for example, he argued, add moral value, within a strong moral framework, in that they identify both rights-holders with specific claims, and duty-bearers with specific legal obligations. His final point dealt with the concept of climate justice in Scotland, specifically the 2009 Climate Change Act and the 2012 Scottish Parliament motion on climate justice. The 2009 Act creates the statutory framework for reducing greenhouse gas emissions and enables the transitioning to a low carbon economy. Meanwhile, the 2012 motion was passed unanimously, and according to Quiroz-Onate, this legislative framework linking human rights to development in Scotland is a highly progressive model, with a climate justice approach as the formal policy of the Scottish Parliament.

 

Finally, speaking from an activist point of view, Oisín Coghlan from Friends of the Earth (Ireland) spoke on climate change legislation in Ireland – specifically, the Climate Action and Low-Carbon Bill 2014. Unfortunately, and in direct contradiction to the Scottish legislature’s success in passing laws, Ireland is considerably off-track on climate change targets due to legislative inactivity. In a challenging analysis, Coghlan argued that the ‘hold up’, ongoing since 2007, is largely due to ‘complex climate change politics’. Before the 2011 election for instance all the main political parties had explicitly committed to climate change legislation, yet since the new Daíl has convened the current coalition parties, Fine Gael and Labour, have not seen it as a priority. All this, he frankly admitted, despite the inception of the coalition on advocating for a climate change law began in 2007, with development NGO’s and faith groups, has been a somewhat sobering, if enlightening experience.

 

A law is needed, Coghlan argued, to provide a ‘policy architecture’ robust enough to drive action on climate change. Otherwise, it invariably falls off the political agenda. Part of the reason the legislation itself has taken so long, he maintained, is due to civil service resistance; where there is a preference for policy flexibility over firm timelines and targets, and where increased external oversight and accountability hold no great appeal. It takes considerable political will to overcome that inertia and political leadership has been lacking, especially given the influence of vested interests such as IBEC and the IFA, concerned about the short-term costs of climate action on their members.

 

Coghlan also argued that climate legislation, while not negating the legitimate interests of the business and farming lobbies, is intended to increase transparency and raise the level of democratic debate on climate policy. The public role of the expert advisory body should help bring the policy decisions out from behind closed doors. Elements in the civil service regard this as restricting Ireland’s room for manoeuvre.

 

This combination of civil service caution and interest-group concern is what stymied the last Government’s Climate Bill which included targets for 2030 and 2050, beyond the 2020 targets Ireland had already agreed to in EU negotiations. Following discussion of mitigation and adaptation, Coghlan finished the session with a somewhat apt and succinct phrase which had been conveyed to him at a recent environmental convention, in relation to climate change and its consequences: manage the unavoidable, but avoid the unmanageable.

 

In summing up the three presentations and placing them within tripartite institutional and policy structures, Dr Dug Cubie of the CCJHR and organiser of the evening’s discussion, argued that to protect the most vulnerable in society we must adapt to a changing climate as well as tackling the root causes via mitigation efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. In particular, climate change adaptation strategies must be understood in terms of linking the global UNFCCC Cancun Adaptation Framework which prioritises approaches that are country-driven, gender-sensitive, transparent, participatory and based on best available science; with the regional, for example the EU adaptation strategies and climate-proofing action at EU and member State level; while at the local level, it is necessary for the Irish National Adaptation Framework and the Climate Action and Low-Carbon Development Bill to articulate a coherent strategic government policy for both adaptation and mitigation measures.

Climate Justice and Adaptation Strategies: public lecture, Thursday 26th June 2014, UCC

“Climate Justice and Adaptation Strategies: Linking Global and Local Initiatives”

On Thursday 26th June 2014, the CCJHR will host a free public discussion on the topic of climate justice and adaptation strategies in Room 107, Western Gateway Building, UCC.

Chaired by Professor Siobhan Mullally, this event brings together a panel of international experts on climate change, human rights and migration to analyse the impact of climate change on the most vulernable in society.

Dr Cosmin Corendea from the UN University in Bonn will commence by presenting his recent research into migration decisions by individuals and communities resulting from the increasing variability of rainfall in countries such as Bangladesh, Peru, and Tanzania. Full details of this research can be found at: www.wheretherainfalls.org

Next, Diego Quiroz-Onate will describe the experience of the Scottish Human Rights Commission in promoting a climate justice approach with policy-makers in Scotland.

Bringing the discussion to the national and local level, Oisin Coghlan from Friends of the Earth (Ireland) will analyse the pending Climate Action and Low Carbon Bill 2014, and discuss the approach to climate change taken by the Irish authorities.

Finally, Dr Dug Cubie, Faculty of Law, UCC will describe the national adaptation framework for Ireland before leading a Q&A session with all contributors.

Date: Thursday 26th June 2014
Time: 4.00pm – 6.00pm
Venue: Room 107, Western Gateway Building, University College Cork

ALL WELCOME
There is no registration fee for this event.
Advance booking is required via www.eventbrite.ie (search for CCJHR).

Human Dignity as a Focus for Criminal Justice and Human Rights: Report on 6th Annual Postgraduate Conference, April 2012

The Centre for Criminal Justice and Human Rights’ 6th Annual Postgraduate Conference was held on 26th April 2012 in Áras na Laoi, UCC on the theme of “Transformation and Reform: Structures and Mechanisms for Rights-Based Protections”. The aim was to critically examine the implications for individuals and rights-based protections that arise from recent proposals for major reforms at the national, European and international level. This was reflected in the variety and high quality of papers presented on a wide range of topics including Scottish and Irish Criminal Processes, Gender and Sexual Offences, Racism and Hate Speech, Irish Legal Processes, International Criminal Law, and International Humanitarian Law.

Professor Christopher McCrudden of Queen’s University Belfast delivered the keynote address examining An Integrated Approach to International Human Rights through the Concept of Human Dignity. Professor McCrudden traced the origins of the concept of human dignity, and noted the implications for both methodological approaches to researching and substantive enforcement of human rights that arise from a renewed focus on human dignity within international human rights law.

 

A video of the event can be seen here

The conference attracted a total of 66 attendees with speakers from across the island of Ireland and the UK, including from UCC, TCD, UCD, the Irish Council for Civil Liberties, University of Ulster, King’s College London, University of Strathclyde, NUIG, the Law Reform Commission, Griffith College Dublin, University of Nottingham, University of Aberdeen, University of Bedfordshire, Queen’s University Belfast, Queen Mary, University of London as well as legal and non-governmental practitioners.

A number of innovations were made to the conference programme this year including the introduction of a competition for best paper. The competition was won by Sarah Singer of Queen Mary, University of London. Sarah presented her paper titled “Exclusion from Refugee Status: Asylum Seekers & Terrorism in the UK” at a plenary session of the conference. The paper was very well received and provided a valuable opportunity to highlight the excellent standard of postgraduate research which the CCJHR seeks to promote.

The conference concluded with a panel discussion on the topic of Transformation and Reform. This was also a new addition to the CCJHR conference programme and allowed for reflection and discussion on the disparate issues raised in the plenary sessions and parallel workshops during the day.

We would like to take this opportunity to thank everyone who attended and presented at the conference, in particular Professor McCrudden and Sarah Singer, and for the excellent support from UCC Faculty staff on the day. Pictures from the conference and a podcast of the keynote speech by Professor McCrudden will be available shortly on the CCJHR website.

LAUNCH OF CITIZENSHIP REPORT: Living in Limbo

The Centre for Criminal Justice and Human Rights, in association with NASC and the Immigrant Council of Ireland, are pleased to announce the following event:

Launch of Citizenship Report: Living in Limbo

at a Lunchtime Seminar

The event will take place on Tuesday 13th March from 12.30 – 2 pm in the  Lewis Glucksman Gallery, UCC

Chair: Justice Catherine McGuinness

Speakers:

  • Catherine Cosgrave (Senior Solicitor, Immigrant Council of Ireland)
  • Michael Lynn B.L.
  • Fiona Finn, CEO, NASC, the Irish Immigrant Support Centre
  • Prof Siobhán Mullally (UCC, Faculty of Law)

See: http://www.nascireland.org/#/naturalisation/4556551099

 Please RSVP to info@nascireland.org

Tel. 021 4317 411

ALL Welcome

CPD Points: 1.5 available

There is no registration fee for this event. Light refreshments will be available.

For further information can be obtained by contacting Claire McCarthy, Policy and Communications officer: clairemccarthy@nascireland.org

Call for Papers: 6th Annual CCJHR Postgraduate Conference, 26th April 2012

The Centre for Criminal Justice and Human Rights (CCHJR) at University College Cork is pleased to announce that the 6th Annual Postgraduate Conference will take place on Thursday, 26th April 2012. The conference is aimed at postgraduate researchers working in the areas of criminal law, criminal justice and human rights.

The theme for this year’s event is “Transformation and Reform: Structures and Mechanisms for Rights-Based Protections”. The aim is to examine the implications for individuals and rights-based protections that arise from recent proposals for major reforms at the national, European and international level, including proposals for changes to the Irish legal profession and potential constitutional amendments, reforms of the treaties and structures of the European Union, and the UN Treaty Body Reform process. This theme is intended to encourage debate and reflection on the challenging question of ensuring the protection of fundamental rights during periods of change and crisis.

This international one-day event is aimed at promising research scholars from Ireland, the UK and Europe in the areas of law, politics, philosophy and the related social sciences. We are especially interested in papers that relate to human rights, criminal justice, criminal law or the intersection of these fields from a national, European or international perspective. We will also welcome papers dealing with issues that fall within the broad theme of the conference.

The keynote address will be delivered by Professor Christopher McCrudden of Queen’s University Belfast. Professor McCrudden is currently working on an integrated theory of comparative human rights law, and is an expert on equality and discrimination, as well as the relationship between international economic law and human rights.

Papers will be streamed thematically. The two best papers, as selected by the conference organisers, will present their paper to the plenary session of the conference.

Abstracts for papers (max. 300 words) should be submitted to the conference organisers by 20th February 2012. Successful conference submissions will be notified by 20th March 2012. To be considered for the best paper and the opportunity to present to the plenary session, full papers should then be submitted by 16th April 2012. Submissions and further enquires should be directed to ucclawconf@gmail.com.

For further information and registration details please visit: www.ucc.ie/en/ccjhr

Please note: a CPD Certificate of Attendance will be available for this conference.

Save the Date: CCJHR 6th Annual Postgraduate Conference, 26th April 2012

The Centre for Criminal Justice and Human Rights (CCHJR) is pleased to announce that the 6th Annual Postgraduate Conference will take place in UCC on Thursday, 26th April 2012. The conference is aimed at postgraduate researchers working in the areas of criminal law, criminal justice and human rights.

Reflecting proposals for major reforms that will directly affect key national, European and international concerns, such as proposals for changes to the Irish legal profession and constitutional amendments, and the UN Treaty Body Reform process, the theme for this year’s event is “Transformation and Reform: Structures and Mechanisms for Rights-Based Protections”. This international one-day event is aimed at promising research scholars from Ireland, the UK and Europe in the areas of law, politics, philosophy and the related social sciences. Further details on the conference and a Call for Papers will be issued in early January 2012. For more information on the CCJHR, please visit: www.ucc.ie/en/ccjhr

Research Seminar – Professor Ngaire Naffine

The Duck/Rabbit and the Common Measure: The Canonical Debate about Abortion and Euthanasia Reconsidered

Professor Ngaire Naffine, University of Adelaide

Wednesday August 31st, 1-2pm

Faculty of Law – Aras na Laoi 1.64 (1st floor)

Ngaire Naffine is a Professor of Law at the University of Adelaide. She has published in the areas of criminology, criminal law, jurisprudence, feminist legal theory and medical law.  Her most recent work explores the influence of philosophy, religion and evolutionary biology on law and the legal person. She is a member of an interdisciplinary research team studying the law and ethics of consent to embryo and organ donation. She has been a Visiting International Scholar at the Hastings Bioethics Center in Garrison New York; a Visiting Scholar in the Faculty of Law, Birkbeck College, University of London, and the European University Institute in Florence Italy; and Baker-Hostetler Professor of Law at Cleveland- Marshall College of Law, Cleveland.  Professor Naffine is a Member of the College of Experts, Humanities and Creative Arts Panel, ARC and a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences of Australia.  Publications include: Law’s Meaning of Life: Philosophy, Religion, Darwin and the Legal Person, Hart Publishing, Oxford, Jan 2009; Gender and Justice (editor), Ashgate , Aldershot, England 2002 pp 482; Are Persons Property? Legal Debates about Property and Personality (with M Davies) Ashgate , Aldershot, England, 2001 pp 209; Intention in Law and Philosophy (co-editor with Rosemary Owens and John Williams), Ashgate, Aldershot, England, 2001 pp 377; Feminism and Criminology, Polity Press, Cambridge, 1997; Sexing the Subject of Law (co editor with Rosemary J Owens) 1997.

Professor Jonathan Simon: Mass Incarceration on Trial

The Centre for Criminal Justice and Human Rights at University College Cork is pleased to announce that Professor Jonathan Simon will give a seminar entitled “Mass Incarceration on Trial” on Wednesday 13th July 2011. 

Professor Simon is the Adrian A. Kragen Professor of Law at the University of California Berkley School of Law. He is the author of “Governing through Crime: How the War on Crime Transformed American Democracy and Created a Culture of Fear” (2007) and “Poor Discipline: Parole and the Social Control of the Underclass,” 1890-1990 (1993).He is also maintains and contributes to the Governing through crime and Berkley Jurisprude blogs. 

The seminar will take place at 3pm on Wednesday 13th July, 2011 in the Moot Court Room, Faculty of Law, Áras na Laoi, UCC. 

If you are interested in attending please email ccjhr@ucc.ie or phone 021 490 2728 by Monday 11th July 2011.

CCJHR 5th Annual Criminal Law Conference

Unfortunately we are not in a position to proceed with the CCJHR Annual Conference entitled “Different Approaches, Same Justice?: Lessons to be Learned Across the White/Blue Collar Divide” this Friday due to circumstances beyond our control.  We hope that the Conference will proceed at a later date.

Further details will be posted on this site once available

The CCJHR is pleased to announce the programme for its 5th Annual Criminal Law Conference entitled Different Approaches, Same Justice? Lessons to be learned across the White/Blue Collar Divide.

The aim of the conference is to review current debates on how those convicted of crime are treated.  Traditionally criminal justice responses have differed depending on the nature of the crime, with imprisonment being the preferred form of deterrence/punishment for ordinary crime and self-governance for white collar crime.

More recently, there have been calls for white collar crime to be treated more punitively.  It is hoped that the various perspectives offered in this conference will contribute to this debate.

The Conference will take place in the Brookfield Health Sciences Complex, Room G_02 on Friday 17th June, 2011 and will run from 10.00 a.m. to 5.00 p.m.

Contributors include:

  • Dr.Fiona Donson, Faculty of Law, University College Cork
  • Dr. Niamh Hourigan, Sociology Department, University College Cork
  • Dr. Deirdre Healy, School of Law, University College Dublin
  • Jane Mulcahy, Research and Policy Officer, Irish Penal Reform Trust
  • Professor Sandeep Gopalan, Head of the Department of Law, National University of Ireland, Maynooth.
  • Joe McGrath, PhD Candidate, Faculty of Law, University College Cork

The full program is now available and can be accessed online here.

Bookings can be made online by clicking here

More information can be obtained from Noreen Delea – Tel: (021)   490 2728 Email: ccjhr@ucc.ie Web: http://www.ucc.ie/en/ccjhr