Human Dignity as a Focus for Criminal Justice and Human Rights: Report on 6th Annual Postgraduate Conference, April 2012

The Centre for Criminal Justice and Human Rights’ 6th Annual Postgraduate Conference was held on 26th April 2012 in Áras na Laoi, UCC on the theme of “Transformation and Reform: Structures and Mechanisms for Rights-Based Protections”. The aim was to critically examine the implications for individuals and rights-based protections that arise from recent proposals for major reforms at the national, European and international level. This was reflected in the variety and high quality of papers presented on a wide range of topics including Scottish and Irish Criminal Processes, Gender and Sexual Offences, Racism and Hate Speech, Irish Legal Processes, International Criminal Law, and International Humanitarian Law.

Professor Christopher McCrudden of Queen’s University Belfast delivered the keynote address examining An Integrated Approach to International Human Rights through the Concept of Human Dignity. Professor McCrudden traced the origins of the concept of human dignity, and noted the implications for both methodological approaches to researching and substantive enforcement of human rights that arise from a renewed focus on human dignity within international human rights law.

 

A video of the event can be seen here

The conference attracted a total of 66 attendees with speakers from across the island of Ireland and the UK, including from UCC, TCD, UCD, the Irish Council for Civil Liberties, University of Ulster, King’s College London, University of Strathclyde, NUIG, the Law Reform Commission, Griffith College Dublin, University of Nottingham, University of Aberdeen, University of Bedfordshire, Queen’s University Belfast, Queen Mary, University of London as well as legal and non-governmental practitioners.

A number of innovations were made to the conference programme this year including the introduction of a competition for best paper. The competition was won by Sarah Singer of Queen Mary, University of London. Sarah presented her paper titled “Exclusion from Refugee Status: Asylum Seekers & Terrorism in the UK” at a plenary session of the conference. The paper was very well received and provided a valuable opportunity to highlight the excellent standard of postgraduate research which the CCJHR seeks to promote.

The conference concluded with a panel discussion on the topic of Transformation and Reform. This was also a new addition to the CCJHR conference programme and allowed for reflection and discussion on the disparate issues raised in the plenary sessions and parallel workshops during the day.

We would like to take this opportunity to thank everyone who attended and presented at the conference, in particular Professor McCrudden and Sarah Singer, and for the excellent support from UCC Faculty staff on the day. Pictures from the conference and a podcast of the keynote speech by Professor McCrudden will be available shortly on the CCJHR website.

Call for Papers: 6th Annual CCJHR Postgraduate Conference, 26th April 2012

The Centre for Criminal Justice and Human Rights (CCHJR) at University College Cork is pleased to announce that the 6th Annual Postgraduate Conference will take place on Thursday, 26th April 2012. The conference is aimed at postgraduate researchers working in the areas of criminal law, criminal justice and human rights.

The theme for this year’s event is “Transformation and Reform: Structures and Mechanisms for Rights-Based Protections”. The aim is to examine the implications for individuals and rights-based protections that arise from recent proposals for major reforms at the national, European and international level, including proposals for changes to the Irish legal profession and potential constitutional amendments, reforms of the treaties and structures of the European Union, and the UN Treaty Body Reform process. This theme is intended to encourage debate and reflection on the challenging question of ensuring the protection of fundamental rights during periods of change and crisis.

This international one-day event is aimed at promising research scholars from Ireland, the UK and Europe in the areas of law, politics, philosophy and the related social sciences. We are especially interested in papers that relate to human rights, criminal justice, criminal law or the intersection of these fields from a national, European or international perspective. We will also welcome papers dealing with issues that fall within the broad theme of the conference.

The keynote address will be delivered by Professor Christopher McCrudden of Queen’s University Belfast. Professor McCrudden is currently working on an integrated theory of comparative human rights law, and is an expert on equality and discrimination, as well as the relationship between international economic law and human rights.

Papers will be streamed thematically. The two best papers, as selected by the conference organisers, will present their paper to the plenary session of the conference.

Abstracts for papers (max. 300 words) should be submitted to the conference organisers by 20th February 2012. Successful conference submissions will be notified by 20th March 2012. To be considered for the best paper and the opportunity to present to the plenary session, full papers should then be submitted by 16th April 2012. Submissions and further enquires should be directed to ucclawconf@gmail.com.

For further information and registration details please visit: www.ucc.ie/en/ccjhr

Please note: a CPD Certificate of Attendance will be available for this conference.

CALL FOR PAPERS: POSTGRADUATE AND EARLY CAREER WORKSHOP WITH PROFESSOR LOIS MCNAY

‘Subjects Before the Law: Membership, Recognition and the Religious Dimensions of Women’s Citizenship.’Workshop with Professor Lois McNay.

We invite PhD students and Early Career Researchers (no more than 3 years post-viva) from any discipline to apply to participate in a workshop, to take place on Thursday, September 9, 2010. The workshop is hosted by the Centre for Criminal Justice and Human Rights and the Institute for Social Science in the 21st Century, University College Cork, Ireland. The workshop is organised as part of an IRCHSS Thematic Project on Gender Equality, Religious Diversity and Multiculturalism in Contemporary Ireland.

The workshop organisers are Eoin Daly and Máiréad Enright.

WORKSHOP THEME

Recent years have witnessed a shift by states away from policies and politics of multiculturalism. Against a background of diminishing state sovereignty, matters of affiliation, allegience, membership and belonging have become important projects for government. Across Europe, transnational and sub-national constellations of belonging are viewed as threatening social cohesion, loosening the ties that bind the nation-state. State responses have been marked by an anxious and exclusionary politics of membership, which seek to restore and re-inscribe the state’s role as first or sole sovereign. Religious citizens have appealed to notions of religious rights grounded in law in an effort to bypass or restrict state scrutiny and regulation of group activity.Such attempts can be seen today in debates on the role of Muslim family law, in litigation on the display and wearing of religious symbols and in the regulation of intimate relations and reproductive autonomy. Historically, the demarcation of gender roles has frequently been intertwined with attempts to identify defining attributes of national identity. Thus, new interactions between religious groups and the state in the field of law have particular implications for women, as gender roles and status become intertwined with the boundaries and limits of membership.

The aim of the workshop is to discuss themes and questions such as:

  • What are the implications for women of the shift away from multicultural policies and politics?
  • Can law provide ‘refuge’ for religion from hostile post-secular politics? How should we imagine the new ‘legal turn’ in religious engagement with the state?
  • Who is the religious subject before the law? How does the law construct women’s religious, cultural and political affiliations? How might it do better?
  • What does recognition theory tell us about the possibilities and limits of religious engagements with law?
  • What are the limits and role of rights discourse in responding to deficiencies in how law ‘sees’ religion?
  • What shape does the ‘public’ concept of citizenship take in the regulation of ‘private sphere’ religious activity?
  • What are the implications of integration and citizenship testing for women? What should be the responses of feminist and human rights discourse to such testing?
  • How useful are concepts of ‘multiplicity’, ‘plurality’ and ‘intersectionality’ to a legal analysis of membership conflicts?
  • Where and how do we locate Ireland in current debates on women’s membership, multiculturalism and the law?

PARTICIPATING

If you would like to present a paper, please email corkworkshop2010@gmail.com to express your interest. Your email should cotain:

  • Your position and the name of your university/research centre.
  • A 250 word abstract of the paper you propose to present at the workshop. Your paper should address an aspect of your thesis or other research as it relates to one or more of the questions set out in the workshop theme above.
  • Your CV, including a list of any publications, forthcoming publications and papers presented at other conferences and workshops to date.
  • The title and short description (no more than 250 words) of your current major research topic (PhD candidates should provide details of their thesis)

Participants will commit to:

  • Producing a draft paper (no more than 7,500 words) for circulation to all participants in advance of the workshop.
  • Presenting their paper to the workshop (for 20 – 25 minutes, with time afterwards for questions and discussion)
  • Acting as a discussant for one of the other papers.
  • Reading the other papers in advance of the workshop and participating in the general discussion of other papers.

Deadline for applications: May 1 2010.

Successful applicants notified: May 15 2010.

Deadline for draft papers: July 15 2010.

WORKSHOP FORMAT

The workshop will begin in the morning with a seminar by Professor Lois McNay (Somerville College Oxford), author of Against Recognition, Gender and Agency:Reconfiguring the Subject in Feminist and Social Theory. and Foucault and Feminism: Power, Gender and the Self. We are particularly keen to receive papers which address Professor McNay’s work on agency and recognition in some respect.

The seminar will be followed by two sessions in which the participants will present and discuss one another’s papers. We plan to restrict participation to a small number group; 6 to 8 at most. We are investigating the possibility that some of the papers will be published after the workshop.

We are in a position to offer a modest grant to participants in the workshop which should cover most if not all of the cost to participants of economy transport to Cork from elsewhere in Ireland, the UK or mainland Europe. We will also provide one night’s accommodation in Cork and meals and refreshments on September 9. There is no additional fee for participation.

The workshop is run in conjunction with a one-day international conference ‘Gendering the Boundaries of Membership’, which will take place in University College Cork on September 10. The conference will feature presentations by a number of prominent scholars working in the area of gender and multiculturalism. Confirmed speak
ers include Anne Phillips (LSE), Audrey Macklin (University of Toronto), Betty de Hart (Radboud Universiteit Nijmegen) and Maleiha Malik (King’s College London). Workshop participants will be welcome to attend the conference free of charge (some meals will be provided on the day).

All queries should be addressed to corkworkshop2010@gmail.com

CCJHR Third Annual Postgraduate Conference: The Promise of Law: Political Claims and the Boundaries of Justice

The Centre for Criminal Justice and Human Rights at UCC will host its third annual postgraduate conference on April 30th, 2009.

The theme for this year’s event is “The Promise of Law: Political Claims and the Boundaries of Justice.” The conference will focus on the intersection of law and politics and the tensions between liberty and political expediency in view of contemporary challenges to civil and human rights principles.

This year’s conference features an exciting mix of papers on a diverse range of topics, approached from empirical, doctrinal and theoretical perspectives. With 50 presenters drawn from a variety of institutions across Ireland and the UK, the 2009 conference is the largest postgraduate conference of its kind.

The keynote address will be delivered by Barbara Hudson, Professor in Law at Lancashire Law School, University of Central Lancashire. Professor Hudson has published widely on gender and criminal justice, penology and social justice. Her latest book is Justice in the Risk Society: Challenging and Re-affirming Justice in Late Modernity (Sage: 2003). The closing address will be delivered by Maleiha Malik, Reader in Law at King’s College London, who has written extensively on discrimination law, minority protection and feminist theory. She is co-author of Discrimination Law: Theory and Practice (Sweet and Maxwell: 2008).

To reserve your place at the conference, please complete a registration form and send it to ucclawconf@gmail.com . There is a €30 attendance fee which can be paid on the day.

For further details of the conference program and to access the registration form click on the link below which will take you to the relevant page of the UCC Law Faculty website:

http://www.ucc.ie/en/ccjhr/fullstory,72483,en.html

Call for Papers – Postgraduate Conference

The Centre for Criminal Justice and Human Rights at University College Cork is pleased to announce its 3rd Annual Postgraduate Conference. The theme for this year’s event is “The Promise of Law: Political Claims and the Boundaries of Justice.” The conference will take place on April 30th 2009.

The conference will focus on the intersection of law and politics and the tensions between liberty and political expediency in view of contemporary challenges to civil and human rights principles. This international one-day conference will attract promising research scholars from Ireland, the UK and Europe. Although a young event, it has become a significant fixture on the Irish legal calendar, and the Centre for Criminal Justice and Human Rights has established a reputation for excellence in this area of scholarship.

We are especially interested in papers that relate to human rights, criminal justice or the intersection of these fields. However, we also welcome papers dealing with issues outside these areas that fall within the broad theme of the conference. It is envisaged that the best papers delivered at the conference may be published online.

The keynote address will be delivered by Barbara Hudson, Professor in Law at Lancashire Law School, whose areas of expertise include cosmopolitan theories of justice and feminist jurisprudence. The closing address will be delivered by Maleiha Malik, Reader in Law at King’s College London, who has written extensively on discrimination law, minority protection and feminist theory.

Please submit an abstract (max. 300 words) to the organising committee by Friday February 13th 2009. Successful conference submissions will be notified by February 27th 2008. Submissions and further enquires should be directed to ucclawconf@gmail.com

LL.M Criminal Justice – Closing Date 1 May 2008

As discussed previously, the LL.M Criminal Justice in University College Cork is currently receiving applications. The closing date for applications is 1 May 2008 and all interested parties are advised to apply within the recommended time frame.

The LL.M in Criminal Justice is an innovative, clinical Masters degree that makes the most of the vibrant atmosphere of graduate study here in UCC, the research conducted in the CCJHR, the excellent adjunct professors appointed to the Faculty including Hon. Justice Paul Carney (presiding judge of the Central Criminal Court), and the exceptional civil society and government links developed by the Faculty of Law. Overseen by LL.M Director Dr. Mary Donnelly and Clinical Legal Education Coordinator Gerard Murphy BL, this LL.M is in exceptionally high demand and entry is competitive.

The LL.M attracts an excellent mix of applicants such as law enforcement officials, NGO officers, people who have just completed a primary law degree, aspiring practitioners and academics, and members of the judiciary. Graduates of the programme go on to work in diverse fields, for example graduates are currently working in practice at the Bar or as a solicitor, in the academy, in government offices such as that of the Director of Public Prosecutions, and in law reform (some graduate profiles are available here).

Anyone with a query relating to the course ought to contact Gerard Murphy (g.murphy[at]ucc.ie)

The 2nd Postgraduate Conference in Criminal Justice and Human Rights

The second annual postgraduate conference on criminal justice and human rights will take place here in the Centre for Criminal Justice and Human Rights on 1 May 2008. The papers are drawn from postgraduate students in Ireland, the UK, the US and Singapore and offer a very broad range of perspectives on criminal justice, human rights, and the interaction between the two. All interested parties are welcome to attend, although you ought to register on or before the 25th of April 2008, using the registration form that can be found here.

The keynote address is entitled The Future of UN Human Rights Treaty Monitoring and will be presented by Professor Michael O’Flaherty of the University of Nottingham and the (UN) Human Rights Committee. The conference will also feature an after-lunch presentation by UCC Law’s Professor Steve Hedley entitled “Finding Employment and Getting Published”, which should be of interest to all aspiring academics.

As in 2007, the conference is supported by Clarus Press. Full details of the conference, including the full programme, are available here.

Call for Papers: CCJHR Post-Graduate Conference on Criminal Justice and Human Rights

The Centre for Criminal Justice and Human Rights is pleased to announce the second postgraduate conference on criminal justice and human rights to be held on Thursday 1 May 2008.

This one-day international conference will attract postgraduate research scholars whose work pertains to criminal justice and human rights. In addition to exploring topics specific to the scholarship of criminal justice or human rights, the conference aims to consider the intersections of both fields. The conference will serve as a forum for discussion and debate among researchers within both fields and between the two fields of study themselves.

The keynote address will be delivered by Michael O’Flaherty, Professor of Applied Human Rights and Co-Director of the Human Rights Law Centre in the School of Law, Faculty of Social Sciences, Law and Education at the University of Nottingham. Professor O’Flaherty is also an elected member of the United Human Rights Committee.

The organisers invite abstracts from postgraduate students working in these areas. The presentation of ongoing work is especially welcome.

The conference will be organised into streams, including but not limited to the following topics:

* Discourses of rights and crime.
* New directions in human rights enforcement.
* Human Rights, Criminal Justice and the War on Terror.
* Transitional justice.
* ECHR and domestic law.
* Asylum and immigration.
* Multiculturalism, minority rights and human rights.
* New trends in International criminal justice.
* Gender and Human Rights.
* Policing.
* Victimology.
* Juvenile justice.
* Punishment and penal policy.

Please submit an abstract (max. 300 words) to the organising committee by February 15th 2008. Successful conference submissions will be notified by February 29th 2008. Submissions and further enquires should be directed to a.d.odonovan[AT]student.ucc.ie