Autumn Publications from CCJHR Members

The Autumn saw a number of publications in criminal justice/human rights and other areas of law from staff and research student members of the CCJHR.

PhD Candidate Claire Murray published “Safeguarding the Right to Liberty of Incapable Compliant Patients with a Mental Disorder in Ireland” in the Dublin University Law Journal in which she considers the current legislative provisions concerning the rights of incapable adults in Irish law and argues that they leave incapable adults susceptible to deprivations of liberty. The article then considers the adequacy of constitutional habeas corpus petitions and Article 5, ECHR litigation to vindicate the right to liberty of these incapable adults.

PhD candidate Olufemi Amao also published an article in the DULJ. His article, entitled “Reconstructing the Role of the Corporation: Multinational Corporations as Public Actors in Nigeria”, considers the role of corporate governance rules in the protection of various stakeholders affected by the operations of multinational corporations operating in Nigeria. Arguing for a paradigm shift in corporate governance in Nigeria, Amao’s article posits generalisable arguments about corporate governance that, in his words, “advocates harnessing the potentials of the private structure for the public interest”.

Dr. Catherine O’Sullivan has an article in the current issue of the Irish Criminal Law Journal entitled “The Burglar and the Burglarised: Self-Defence, Home-Defence and Barnes” (p. 10). The article concerns the recent Court of Criminal Appeal decision in DPP v Barnes ([2006] IECCA 165) in which a burglar who had caused the death of the homeowner attempted to appeal a murder conviction on the basis of self defence. O’Sullivan contextualises the case in the light of DPP v Nally ([2006] IECCA 168) and the LRC proposals on self-defence (Consultation Paper on Legitimate Defence).

Dr. Ursula Kilkelly has published “Complicated Childhood: the rights of children in committed relationships” in Binchy & Doyle (Eds) Committed Relationships and the Law (Four Courts Press; Purchase).

Dr. Shane Kilcommins and Dr. Barry Vaughan (IPA) published “The Europeanization of Human Rights: An Obstacle to Authoritarian Policing in Ireland” in the European Journal of Criminology. The article explores the extent to which European human rights standards (mostly the ECHR) “temper[..] the shift towards a repressive model of criminal justice by introducing greater regulation and oversight of policing” in Ireland.

Fiona de Londras has published “The Right to Challenge the Lawfulness of Detention: An International Perspective on U.S. Detention of Suspected-Terrorists” in the Journal of Conflict and Security Law (currently available by advance access) in which she considers the role of detention practices of the US in the ‘War on Terrorism’ and advocates the vindication of suspected terrorists’ right to challenge the lawfulness of their detention under international human rights law. She also published a comprehensive text book on The Principles of Irish Property Law (Clarus Press; Purchase).

Dr. Mary Donnelly and Fidelma White have published “Webtraders’ obligations under the Distance Selling Regulations 2001—From legal standards to best practice” in The Commercial Law Practitioner (p. 172) in which they consider webtraders’ pre-contract information obligations under the European Communities (Protection of Consumers in Respect of Contracts made by means of Distance Communication) Regulations 2001 and principles of best practice that exceed the requirements of the Regulations but that might nonetheless be adopted by webtraders for reputational reasons. The article presents the authors’ arguments in the context of an empirical study of 80 Ireland-based websites.