CCJHR 5th Annual Criminal Law Conference

Unfortunately we are not in a position to proceed with the CCJHR Annual Conference entitled “Different Approaches, Same Justice?: Lessons to be Learned Across the White/Blue Collar Divide” this Friday due to circumstances beyond our control.  We hope that the Conference will proceed at a later date.

Further details will be posted on this site once available

The CCJHR is pleased to announce the programme for its 5th Annual Criminal Law Conference entitled Different Approaches, Same Justice? Lessons to be learned across the White/Blue Collar Divide.

The aim of the conference is to review current debates on how those convicted of crime are treated.  Traditionally criminal justice responses have differed depending on the nature of the crime, with imprisonment being the preferred form of deterrence/punishment for ordinary crime and self-governance for white collar crime.

More recently, there have been calls for white collar crime to be treated more punitively.  It is hoped that the various perspectives offered in this conference will contribute to this debate.

The Conference will take place in the Brookfield Health Sciences Complex, Room G_02 on Friday 17th June, 2011 and will run from 10.00 a.m. to 5.00 p.m.

Contributors include:

  • Dr.Fiona Donson, Faculty of Law, University College Cork
  • Dr. Niamh Hourigan, Sociology Department, University College Cork
  • Dr. Deirdre Healy, School of Law, University College Dublin
  • Jane Mulcahy, Research and Policy Officer, Irish Penal Reform Trust
  • Professor Sandeep Gopalan, Head of the Department of Law, National University of Ireland, Maynooth.
  • Joe McGrath, PhD Candidate, Faculty of Law, University College Cork

The full program is now available and can be accessed online here.

Bookings can be made online by clicking here

More information can be obtained from Noreen Delea – Tel: (021)   490 2728 Email: ccjhr@ucc.ie Web: http://www.ucc.ie/en/ccjhr

Some Irish Prisons Unsafe

A report by the (COE) Committee for the Prevention of Torture claims that three Irish prisons – St. Patrick’s, Mountjoy and Limerick – are unsafe and degrading due to a high rate of inter-prisoner violence and intimidation, which it links to a lack of activities and the easy availability of drugs. Detainees interviewed also claimed that they were frequently subjected to abuse (verbal and physical) when arrested. The Irish government has made the Report public (which it is not required to do) and claims that it is working to ensure adequacy of activities and to restrict the availability of illegal drugs inside prisons.

Irish Independent; Irish Times

US Supreme Court to Hear Death Penalty Case

The US Supreme Court yesterday confirmed that it would hear Baze v. Rees (07-543) in the upcoming term. The case will involve the Court in considering what standard ought to be used to determine whether a particular combination of chemicals used in a lethal injection causes excessive pain and suffering and ought not to be allowed. The case does not involve an imminent execution, therefore it is unlikely that briefing and hearings will be expedited, but it will mark the first time the Court has considered the constitutionality of various methods of execution since Wilkerson v. Utah, decided in 1878.

See the petition for certiorari here and the supplemental filing here.

In a tangential development, Italy yesterday urged UN member states to consider imposing a global moritorium on the death penalty with a view to its abolition – UN News Centre report.